Creating a Unique and Personal Backsplash

How to Create a Backsplash That’s Unique and Personal

By Shelby Deering

A backsplash is a surface on a kitchen wall that takes up the space between the upper cabinets and countertops, but it is so much more than that. It’s also an efficient way to bring instant design and style to your kitchen. A backsplash is an easy, cost-effective solution when you want to refresh the visual appeal of your kitchen and do so in a short amount of time. It’s also a wonderful way to showcase your personal tastes and make your kitchen stand out from the rest.

Floor & Home Consultant Crystal Welsh explains that for a backsplash, “the standard space is 18 inches from the countertop to the underside of the upper cabinets and 30 inches from the cooktop to the hood.” Although there are some standards when it comes to backsplashes, through your design choices, you can make yours look anything but standard.

Welsh says that subway tile continues to reign supreme, but there are many variations out there to make your backsplash look more distinctive, with materials ranging from metal to tile to glass. You can also switch up the sizing of the tiles to make it eye-catching. “We use a 4×16 tile for many backsplash areas which gives it a bit more of a modern look with a larger-scale subway kind of tile,” Welsh says.

There’s plenty of creativity around backsplash materials, Welsh shares. She says that you can choose to use mosaic tile, natural stone tile or large-format porcelain to push the envelope. “I’ve seen sheets of metal, which are sometimes decorative, used as a backsplash,” she adds.

People are increasingly requesting unique backsplashes for their kitchens. Welsh says, “There are so many fun styles and tile shapes we are seeing more and more of—it’s a daily challenge to keep up our inventory of samples!”

Welsh advises, “Before selecting a backsplash, you’ll want to have your countertop selected.” If you are envisioning a one-of-a-kind backsplash for your kitchen, Welsh says, “Use a mosaic that has color and splash if you are trying to achieve a captivating design.”

Welsh recommends that if you have a countertop with busy patterns or colors, you should think about sticking with a simpler-style backsplash. “If you want to add texture with a busy countertop, that’s fine, but stay simple in the color of the tile,” she says.

Lastly, you can choose a distinct pattern for your backsplash to make it pop.

“You can design a backsplash with a herringbone design, a double herringbone or use a stacked or ½ brick set for the design,” Welsh says. “There are a million different mosaics I have used with clients to mesh designs within their home between a midcentury modern design and rustic farmhouse design. I have used the lantern shape or arabesque shape a lot, as well as a narrower tile to create a chevron pattern. For material, I have used glass, ceramic, porcelain and a mix of stone, glass and metal. The possibilities are quite endless for a backsplash.”

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